Reduce Occupational Injuries With Industrial Safety Training

Industrial Safety Training Saves Money on Lost Hours and Medical Expenses

One effect of workplace accidents—which can cost companies an average of $350,000—is twofold: safety training is an absolute must for industrial jobs, and the ROI is worth it, substantially.

Overall, fatal workplace accidents in the U.S. are declining. But the numbers are still huge and pretty scary. More than 4,000 Americans die from on-the-job injuries every year, and each year sees more than 3 million non-fatal accidents, injuries, and illnesses. Not only that, but the annual cost of occupational accidents is over $170 billion.

For some small businesses, injuries are a once-a-year fluke. For others, it’s an understood risk. Industrial jobs at manufacturing plants and the like are prey to workplace injuries by their very nature.

The industrial workforce truly relies on the protection of OSHA regulations and inspections—whose effectiveness is constantly called into question. A study by professors from the Harvard School of Business of OSHA’s random workplace inspections revealed that companies who received random inspections showed a 9.4 percent decrease in occupational injuries. The effect on a business’s bottom line was alarming. On average, each company saved $350,000 on medical expenses and lost wages. The results are convincing, but merely being aware of a problem doesn’t guarantee a timely fix or solution. Some companies don’t have the resources or budget to complete the scrolls of paperwork and conduct the follow-up inspections left in OSHA’s wake.

A cost-effective way to address the issue is investing in industrial safety training. Industrial plant safety training will reduce occupational accidents in and of itself, but it will also help companies pass OSHA inspections and correct existing problems. If you don’t have the time or funding to train an entire team, industrial safety manager training will give one person the ability to impart advanced industrial safety practices to other workers.

Quality supervision and industrial management skills are also critical to reducing accidents at work. It’s estimated that 88 percent of injuries that occur on the job are a result of human factors or mistakes, which means most are probably preventable with more worker education and industrial safety courses. The cost of industrial skills training tends to be worth it because it saves money on other avoided expenses, like the fines, reviews, and inspections that often follow injuries requiring hospitalization. Boeing, who has been fined by the stringent state of Washington for workplace accidents, knows this all too well.

Safety training also helps uncover compliance issues before officials do, or worse, before a hardworking adult gets severely injured.

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