“Re-shoring” Efforts Yield Job Growth in Manufacturing

U.S. Manufacturing Reclaims Some Outsourced Jobs

The manufacturing sector continues to provide some significant job growth, but will it be enough when the workforce lacks basic industrial training?

The Obama administration is still hopeful that the manufacturing push will yield jobs and more American-made goods. Well, it looks like some of these efforts are paying off. Gradual improvements in the manufacturing industry made some changes appear insignificant, but economists argue the manufacturing sector has been a major and reliable source of growth in the economy since the Great Recession.

Data from the Department of Labor seems to agree.

Plant work and manufacturers created 120,000 jobs in the first three months of the year. Ford Motor is doing their part; the car company added 5,500 jobs this year that were previously outsourced. Ford reacquired the production of certain high-tech components used to assemble hybrid cars—like battery packs and transmissions—from Japan and Mexico. But automakers aren’t the only ones bringing jobs back to the states; mega corporations and small private companies alike are reclaiming jobs.

Chesapeake Bay Candles will now actually be from the Chesapeake Bay-area. GE is continuing its reign of expansion to appliances, aviation and locomotives. Last year alone, GE added 10,000 jobs. The multi-industry giant is projecting at least another 900 factory jobs by 2013. So, maybe the recent jobs report wasn’t a clear indication of the whole economic recovery picture. But if plants and factories are to make the most of new hires—and sustain ramped-up production—they need to invest in manufacturing plant training.

The second part of creating manufacturing jobs is enabling the workforce through education and industrial safety training. Not enough businesses see the value of in-sourcing because a large segment of the unemployed doesn’t have the necessary skill sets. Last year reported a record-breaking number of U.S. exports of nearly $20 billion, part of which is thanks to the construction/mining equipment maker Caterpillar (CAT). Since their heavy-duty construction equipment, especially mining machinery, has global appeal, they increased production efforts in the U.S. and put more money in the national pocket. But, increased production doesn’t mean much if workers don’t have manufacturing training.

According to CNN Money, the American workforce is at its smallest size since the 1980s. Although there has been some significant job growth, many have just stopped “engaging” with the job market—aka “job market dropouts.” It appears some adults have temporarily conceded to unemployment and returned to the drawing board for community college classes and technical skills, like manufacturing plant training. Job skills depreciate the longer someone is out of work and vocational education seems to be the only option left.

To offset the economic imbalance caused by discouraged “dropouts,” various sectors (especially the reliable manufacturing industry) must invest in the unofficially unemployed through industrial safety training, electrical training, operations training and more. Long-term investments yield more jobs, national revenue and exports, and America desperately needs all three.

Harness Workforce Potential With Manufacturing Plant Training

The economy has a long way to go to full recovery, but the manufacturing industry is creating new jobs. Manufacturing training is an affordable way to harness a new workforce and make employees indispensible.

In the tech-driven world we find ourselves in, many jobs are rendered obsolete by the emergence of more efficient technology. But according to President Obama’s weekly address on MSNBC Jan. 19, manufacturers are hiring for the first time since the 1990s. Despite advanced equipment, manufacturing plants can be an abundant source of much-needed jobs. President Obama strongly advocates the need to invest in and support American manufacturing for both employment and trade purposes. Plants and factories can invest in their workforce through industrial safety training, a cost-efficient way to improve plant safety.

A thriving manufacturing industry means companies can outsource less, employ more hard-working Americans, and increase our number of exports. From the production of raw materials to finished products, mills and factories are responsible for infrastructure, automobiles, electronics, energy and other critical components of daily life. The American economy runs on the vast-producing manufacturing industry the way tires rely on tread to grip pavement. The industry is critical to our ability to compete in a global trade market; otherwise we have no traction. Hard workers are a factor of this equation, and quality workers are only improved by quality training.

Manufacturing safety training benefits old and new workers alike. Employees become even more valuable when armed with industrial safety training, unrivaled experience, and polished skills. The best machines and equipment simply can’t compare. Since manufacturing plant training is available online, it’s an affordable expense that helps even out the playing field for employees with different knowledge and experience levels.

The manufacturing industry will never boom like it did in the 1950s—it’s only one of many economic sectors—but it can alleviate some of the pressure from high unemployment rates. The Federal Reserve says factories added some 50,000 positions to the slim pool of job opportunity in January alone, and accounted for 13 percent of all the jobs created last year. By capitalizing on the steady hiring increase over the past five months with online industrial training, employees become truly irreplaceable.

New hires need custom training. With the advantage of manufacturing plant training and the ability to customize your courses, the hiring process is as efficient as possible. Your employee retention rate increases while the number of accidents decreases, which means overall factory output expands. Manufacturing training will help you harness the potential of a new workforce to improve productivity and enhance safety.

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